Pre-AP English 2

Week of January 17-20, 2017

Pre-AP English 2

Pre-AP English 2

Monday, January 17, 2017

Objective

(Student will…)

  1. define rhetoric and identify its four aims
  2. understand the rhetorical triangle and use it to enhance their analysis of the essay
  3. gain the tools necessary for analysis of the rhetorical components of the kind of text that appears on the AP English Language and Composition Exam.

Class Starter

 

Teacher Activities

No School-Martin Luther King Day

Student Activities

No School-Martin Luther King Day

Assessment/Evaluation

 

Homework

 

Academic Vocabulary

 

Modifications

Due to having students at multiple levels of second language acquisition (TESOL) and students who need special education modifications, handouts will be available. Lessons will be taught using differentiated instruction and multiple modalities. Extra time is allowed as according to IEP, and mentors will be assigned to help language learners who are struggling.

Pre-AP English 2

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Objective

(Student will…)

  1. define rhetoric and identify its four aims
  2. understand the rhetorical triangle and use it to enhance their analysis of the essay
  3. gain the tools necessary for analysis of the rhetorical components of the kind of text that appears on the AP English Language and Composition Exam.

Class Starter

Two students will present their individual rhetorical devices

Teacher Activities

  1. Review the vocabulary for this week’s quiz.
  2. Discuss and share advertisement homework.
  1. Begin with a brief review of the concepts of pathos, logos, and ethos from the previous session. Ask students to demonstrate their growing understanding by providing examples of each of the techniques from advertisements they have recently seen.
  2. Now introduce the termdemographicsto students: the characteristics that make up a human population such as gender, age, and race. Have students discover which demographic group(s) they fit into by completing theDemographics: Who are you?handout.
  3. Explain to students that this is how advertisers think of consumers: not as individuals, but as members of groups that tend to believe, behave, or purchase in certain patterns. Even when an advertisement is appealing to the idea of individuality (such as Burger King's "Have It Your Way" promotion), advertisers are appealing to the demographic group of "people who like to be thought of as individuals," not to any single consumer.
  4. Continue the discussion of demographics by distributing theTargeted Commercialshandout, which will further explore the concept of demographics.
  5. Ask students to begin applying their understanding of demographics and targeted advertising by showing the first part of a television program of your choice. Since the purpose of this activity is to show how advertisers cater to a show's intended audience, you may want to make sure you are presenting a show with commercials that very obviously target a specific demographic.
  6. Before watching, share with students a brief description of the show they are about to see, including race/gender/class of the main characters, genre of the program, and the time/date/channel on which the program aired. Have students use these factors (and any other prior knowledge they may have of the show) to determine the probable demographics. Students should indicate their choices on thehandout.
  7. While students watch the commercial break(s), have them take brief notes to remind them of the products being advertised.
  8. Have students complete the "After the program" response question at the bottom of theTargeted Commercials handout. Then discuss the degrees to which the advertisements match the demographics of the likely intended audience of the television program.
  1. This would be an appropriate time to talk about clear evidence that programming and advertising are marketed to specific groups. Lifetime: Television for Women, Spike! TV, Logo, and Black Entertainment Television all exist not only to give viewers programming they might like, but also to allow advertisers to target their audiences more specifically.

Student Activities

  1. Copy vocabulary for Friday’s quiz.
  2. Volunteer to share examples of homework.
  3. Begin with a brief review of the concepts of pathos, logos, and ethos from the previous session. Ask students to demonstrate their growing understanding by providing examples of each of the techniques from advertisements they have recently seen.
  4. Now introduce the termdemographicsto students: the characteristics that make up a human population such as gender, age, and race. Have students discover which demographic group(s) they fit into by completing theDemographics: Who are you?handout.
  5. Explain to students that this is how advertisers think of consumers: not as individuals, but as members of groups that tend to believe, behave, or purchase in certain patterns. Even when an advertisement is appealing to the idea of individuality (such as Burger King's "Have It Your Way" promotion), advertisers are appealing to the demographic group of "people who like to be thought of as individuals," not to any single consumer.
  6. Continue the discussion of demographics by distributing theTargeted Commercialshandout, which will further explore the concept of demographics.
  7. Ask students to begin applying their understanding of demographics and targeted advertising by showing the first part of a television program of your choice. Since the purpose of this activity is to show how advertisers cater to a show's intended audience, you may want to make sure you are presenting a show with commercials that very obviously target a specific demographic.
  8. Before watching, share with students a brief description of the show they are about to see, including race/gender/class of the main characters, genre of the program, and the time/date/channel on which the program aired. Have students use these factors (and any other prior knowledge they may have of the show) to determine the probable demographics. Students should indicate their choices on thehandout.
  9. While students watch the commercial break(s), have them take brief notes to remind them of the products being advertised.
  10. Have students complete the "After the program" response question at the bottom of theTargeted Commercials handout. Then discuss the degrees to which the advertisements match the demographics of the likely intended audience of the television program.
  1. This would be an appropriate time to talk about clear evidence that programming and advertising are marketed to specific groups. Lifetime: Television for Women, Spike! TV, Logo, and Black Entertainment Television all exist not only to give viewers programming they might like, but also to allow advertisers to target their audiences more specifically.

Assessment/Evaluation

homework, participation

Homework

Work on vocabulary

Distribute theCommercial Digactivity, explaining to students that this is a long-term assignment that requires them to keep track of eight commercials viewed during one television program and to explain briefly the purpose of each advertised product. Remind students that the commercials they record on this chart should all come from the same show, as the completed chart will be used to re-emphasize the concepts of demographics and targeted advertising. Inform them that this assignment should be completed by Session Four and ask if there are questions before closing the session.

Academic Vocabulary

rhetoric, persuade, strategy, ethos, logos, and pathos

Modifications

Due to having students at multiple levels of second language acquisition (TESOL) and students who need special education modifications, handouts will be available. Lessons will be taught using differentiated instruction and multiple modalities. Extra time is allowed as according to IEP, and mentors will be assigned to help language learners who are struggling.

Pre-AP English 2

Wednesday, January 19, 2017

Objective

(Student will…)

  1. define rhetoric and identify its four aims
  2. understand the rhetorical triangle and use it to enhance their analysis of the essay
  3. gain the tools necessary for analysis of the rhetorical components of the kind of text that appears on the AP English Language and Composition Exam.

Class Starter

Two students will present their individual rhetorical devices.

Teacher Activities

  1. Distribute theAnalyzing Adshandout and discuss the expectations and format for response. Students will analyze six advertisements: two print ads, two television commercials, and two Internet advertisements. The Internet advertisements should take the form of marketing Websites featuring a particular product, or pop-ups/embedded ads in Websites unrelated to the product.
  2. This activity will allow students to practice their recognition of pathos, logos, and ethos in three different modes of advertising, preparing them for the creation of their own commercials. Students should also record any of the "other strategies" explained onPersuasive Techniques in Advertisinghandout, also required as part of the final project.
  3. Provide students time to research on the computer.

Student Activities

  1. Look over the Analyzing Adshandout and discuss the expectations and format for response. You will analyze six advertisements: two print ads, two television commercials, and two Internet advertisements. The Internet advertisements should take the form of marketing Websites featuring a particular product, or pop-ups/embedded ads in Websites unrelated to the product.
  2. This activity will allow students to practice their recognition of pathos, logos, and ethos in three different modes of advertising, preparing them for the creation of their own commercials. Students should also record any of the "other strategies" explained onPersuasive Techniques in Advertisinghandout, also required as part of the final project.
  1. Provide students time to research on the computer.

Assessment/Evaluation

Participation

Homework

Work on advertisement handout

Academic Vocabulary

rhetoric, persuade, strategy, ethos, logos, and pathos

Modifications

Due to having students at multiple levels of second language acquisition (TESOL) and students who need special education modifications, handouts will be available. Lessons will be taught using differentiated instruction and multiple modalities. Extra time is allowed as according to IEP, and mentors will be assigned to help language learners who are struggling.

English 3

Thursday, January 19, 2017

Objective

(Student will…)

  1. define rhetoric and identify its four aims
  2. understand the rhetorical triangle and use it to enhance their analysis of the essay
  3. gain the tools necessary for analysis of the rhetorical components of the kind of text that appears on the AP English Language and Composition Exam.

Class Starter

Two students will present their individual rhetorical devices

Teacher Activities

  1. Begin building the rhetorical toolbox.
  2. Distribute to each student nine strips of index cards.
  3. Instruct students to write on one side of the strip the name of the rhetorical form. On the reverse side, write a few words or phrases that are likely to be found in this form. narrative and description; definition, classification, and example; cause-and-effect; compare and contrast; and assertion/justification
  4. Give each student four whole index cards. Have them label one side with diction, syntax, tone, figurative language. On the back of the cards, write the following questions.
  5. Is the diction mostly formal or mostly informal? Mostly polysyllabic (Latinate and Greek) words or mostly short (Anglo-Saxon) words? Is the diction scientific, scholarly, or conversational? If it's conversational, is it colloquial? Slang?
  6. Are the sentences mostly long or mostly short? Are most of the sentences meandering, or are they terse? What kinds of punctuation do we see? How does this punctuation establish relationships among ideas within the sentences? Is there cataloging of information?
  7. Is the tone mostly serious or mostly playful? What emotions do you sense from the writer?
  8. Is the language mostly literal or mostly metaphorical? Do the metaphors bring to mind something positive or something negative?
  9. Provide each student with fifteen strips from the index cards. On each strip, one rhetorical device appears, along with a brief definition. On the reverse side is an example.
  10. Allow the student to write the following words on the strip..

allusion, anadiplosis, analogy, anaphora, apostrophe, asyndeton, chiasmus, climax, epistrophe, epithet, litotes, metonymy, parallelism, personification, polysyndeton, rhetorical question, and synecdoche.

Student Activities

  1. Begin building the rhetorical toolbox.
  2. Write on one side of the strip, provided by the teacher, the name of the rhetorical form. On the reverse side, write a few words or phrases that are likely to be found in this form.
  3. Label one side of the teacher provided whole index cards with diction, syntax, tone, figurative language. On the back of the cards, write the following questions.
  1. Is the diction mostly formal or mostly informal? Mostly polysyllabic (Latinate and Greek) words or mostly short (Anglo-Saxon) words? Is the diction scientific, scholarly, or conversational? If it's conversational, is it colloquial? Slang?
  2. Are the sentences mostly long or mostly short? Are most of the sentences meandering, or are they terse? What kinds of punctuation do we see? How does this punctuation establish relationships among ideas within the sentences? Is there cataloging of information?
  3. Is the tone mostly serious or mostly playful? What emotions do you sense from the writer?
  4. Is the language mostly literal or mostly metaphorical? Do the metaphors bring to mind something positive or something negative?
  1. On each of the fifteen strips, one rhetorical device appears, along with a brief definition. On the reverse side is an example.
  2. Write the following words on the strip.

allusion, anadiplosis, analogy, anaphora, apostrophe, asyndeton, chiasmus, climax, epistrophe, epithet, litotes, metonymy, parallelism, personification, polysyndeton, rhetorical question, and synecdoche.

Assessment/Evaluation

Rhetorical toolbox/ Complete Analyzing Ads.

Homework

Work on vocabulary and complete toolbox.

Academic vocabulary

allusion, anadiplosis, analogy, anaphora, apostrophe, asyndeton, chiasmus, climax, epistrophe, epithet, litotes, metonymy, parallelism, personification, polysyndeton, rhetorical question, and synecdoche, syntax, tone, figurative language. narrative and description; definition, classification, and example; cause-and-effect; compare and contrast; and assertion/justification

Pre-AP English 2

Friday, January 20, 2017

Objective

(Student will…)

  1. define rhetoric and identify its four aims
  2. understand the rhetorical triangle and use it to enhance their analysis of the essay
  3. gain the tools necessary for analysis of the rhetorical components of the kind of text that appears on the AP English Language and Composition Exam.

Class Starter

Two students will present their individual rhetorical devices

Teacher Activities

  1. Distribute and monitor vocabulary quiz.
  2. Allow students to get on the laptop and research the life of Shakespeare.

Student Activities

  1. Complete vocabulary quiz.
  2. Allow students to get on the laptop and research the life of Shakespeare.

Assessment/Evaluation

Rhetorical toolbox, notes, homework

Homework

Definition and example of each term.

Academic vocabulary

allusion, anadiplosis, analogy, anaphora, apostrophe, asyndeton, chiasmus, climax, epistrophe, epithet, litotes, metonymy, parallelism, personification, polysyndeton, rhetorical question, and synecdoche, syntax, tone, figurative language. narrative and description; definition, classification, and example; cause-and-effect; compare and contrast; and assertion/justification

 

 

Website by SchoolMessenger Presence. © 2017 West Corporation. All rights reserved.