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Pre-AP English 2

English 2 Pre-AP

 
Week of March 2-6, 2015

English 2 Pre-AP

Monday, March 2, 2015

Objective

(Student will…)

  1. says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. RL.9-10.1
  2. analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise. RL.9-10.5
  3. analyze in detail how an author’s ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter). RI.9-10.5
  4. delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning. RI.9-10.8

Class Starter

Student presentations

Teacher Activities

  1. We are going to examine tool box terms/poetry glossary terms.
  2. Now that we have explored the “what” of “Daily,” we are ready to examine the “how” and the “why.”We are going to help you look at the details, images,, similes, and metaphors.
  3. List the concrete details and images that help the students picture the speaker’s daily life i.e. (shriveled seeds, corn kernels, dried bean.
  4. Working with your class or small groups, identify the similes and metaphors in the poem.
  5. As a class, examine free verse. Note that the free verse poem employs varying line lengths and no end punctuation. What is the effect of the free verse structure of “Daily?”
  6. With a partner of small group, go through the poem line-by-line, focusing on each specific word, phrase, and line. Remind the students their inquiry questions have prepared them for this process. They may have already developed a strong sense of how all the elements of this poem work together to make a statement about life.
  7. Use these questions and suggestions as prompts to lead a discussion about interpretation.
    1. “Daily” suggests a full and rich life experience with very few word. What lines and words are saying more than their surface meaning suggests? How do the poetic elements support the overall impression?
    2. Where does the speaker shoe us her feelings about her family? Is Nye’s speaker any homemaker lovingly performing daily tasks, or is she Nye herself? What lines suggest that this poem is an example of a poem about poetry? How is the speaker an artist in every aspect of her life?
    3. What is Nye saying to all of us about daily life, and how does she say it?

Modifications

Due to having students at multiple levels of second language acquisition (TESOL) and students who need special education modifications, handouts will be available. Lessons will be taught using differentiated instruction and multiple modalities. Extra time is allowed as according to IEP, and mentors will be assigned to help language learners who are struggling.

Student Activities

  1. Discussion Allusion a Day #7
  2. We are going to examine tool box terms/poetry glossary terms.
  3. Now that we have explored the “what” of “Daily,” we are ready to examine the “how” and the “why.”We are going to help you look at the details, images,, similes, and metaphors.
  4. List the concrete details and images that help the students picture the speaker’s daily life i.e. (shriveled seeds, corn kernels, dried bean.
  5. Working with your class or small groups, identify the similes and metaphors in the poem.
  6. As a class, examine free verse. Note that the free verse poem employs varying line lengths and no end punctuation. What is the effect of the free verse structure of “Daily?”
  7. With a partner of small group, go through the poem line-by-line, focusing on each specific word, phrase, and line. Remind the students their inquiry questions have prepared them for this process. They may have already developed a strong sense of how all the elements of this poem work together to make a statement about life.
  8. Use these questions and suggestions as prompts to lead a discussion about interpretation.
    1. “Daily” suggests a full and rich life experience with very few word. What lines and words are saying more than their surface meaning suggests? How do the poetic elements support the overall impression?
    2. Where does the speaker shoe us her feelings about her family? Is Nye’s speaker any homemaker lovingly performing daily tasks, or is she Nye herself? What lines suggest that this poem is an example of a poem about poetry? How is the speaker an artist in every aspect of her life?
  9. What is Nye saying to all of us about daily life, and how does she say it?

Assessment/Evaluation

Student presentations

Homework

Keep working on presentations, study vocabulary

Academic Vocabulary

 

English 2 Pre-AP

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Objective

(Student will…)

  1. cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. RL.9-10.1
  2. analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise. RL.9-10.5
  3. analyze in detail how an author’s ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter). RI.9-10.5
  4. delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning. RI.9-10.8

Class Starter

Poetry Glossary Terms Student Presentations

Teacher Activities

  1. Help students set up for presentations
  2. Introduce students to the PARCC tutorial and introduce them to the tools they will use.
  3. Use chocolate to encourage student participation

Modifications

Due to having students at multiple levels of second language acquisition (TESOL) and students who need special education modifications, handouts will be available. Lessons will be taught using differentiated instruction and multiple modalities. Extra time is allowed as according to IEP, and mentors will be assigned to help language learners who are struggling.

Student Activities

  1. Set up for presentations
  2. Lean about the PARCC tutorial and the tools you will use.
  3. Get chocolate as an encouragement for student participation

Assessment/Evaluation

Participation, questions, presentation

Homework

Study vocabulary words and presentations

Academic Vocabulary

Poetry Glossary Terms, allusions



English 2 Pre-AP

Wednesday, March 4, 2015

Objective

(Student will…)

  1. cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. RL.9-10.1
  2. analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise. RL.9-10.5
  3. analyze in detail how an author’s ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter). RI.9-10.5
  4. delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning. RI.9-10.8

Class Starter

Poetry Glossary Terms Student Presentations

Teacher Activities

  1. Help students set up for presentations
  2. Introduce students to the PARCC practice test and review the tools they will use.
  3. Use chocolate to encourage student participation

Modifications

Due to having students at multiple levels of second language acquisition (TESOL) and students who need special education modifications, handouts will be available. Lessons will be taught using differentiated instruction and multiple modalities. Extra time is allowed as according to IEP, and mentors will be assigned to help language learners who are struggling.

Student Activities

  1. Set up for presentations
  2. Lean about the PARCC practice test and review the tools you will use.
  3. Get chocolate as an encouragement for student participation

Assessment/Evaluation

Participation, questions

Homework

Vocabulary words and presentations

Academic Vocabulary

Poetry glossary

English 2 Pre-AP

Thursday, March 5, 2015

Objective

(Student will…)

  1. cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. RL.9-10.1
  2. analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise. RL.9-10.5
  3. analyze in detail how an author’s ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter). RI.9-10.5
  4. delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning. RI.9-10.8

Class Starter

Poetry Glossary Terms Student Presentations

Teacher Activities

  1. Help students set up for presentations
  2. Have students take a PARCC practice test and review the tools they will use.
  3. Use chocolate to encourage student participation

Modifications

Due to having students at multiple levels of second language acquisition (TESOL) and students who need special education modifications, handouts will be available. Lessons will be taught using differentiated instruction and multiple modalities. Extra time is allowed as according to IEP, and mentors will be assigned to help language learners who are struggling.

Student Activities

  1. Set up for presentations
  2. Lean about the PARCC practice test and review the tools you will use.
  3. Get chocolate as an encouragement for student participation

Assessment/Evaluation

Participation and presentation

Homework

Study vocabulary and presentations

Academic vocabulary

Poetry glossary terms

English 2 Pre-AP

Friday, March 6, 2015

Objective

(Student will…)

  1. cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. RL.9-10.1
  2. analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise. RL.9-10.5
  3. analyze in detail how an author’s ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter). RI.9-10.5
  4. delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning. RI.9-10.8

Class Starter

Poetry Glossary Terms Student Presentations

Teacher Activities

  1. Finish any presentations
  2. Distribute and monitor vocabulary quiz

Modifications

Due to having students at multiple levels of second language acquisition (TESOL) and students who need special education modifications, handouts will be available. Lessons will be taught using differentiated instruction and multiple modalities. Extra time is allowed as according to IEP, and mentors will be assigned to help language learners who are struggling.

Student Activities

  1. Take notes over any presentations
  2. Complete vocabulary quiz

Assessment/Evaluation

Vocabulary quiz

Homework

Relax and sleep in preparation for the PARCC

Academic Vocabulary

Poetry glossary

Differentiating Instruction

In my classroom, I have used several different methods for differentiating instruction. I have used reading quizzes that are in the form of open ended responses. Some students focus more on certain aspects of reading than others, and the open ended response format allows for that to occur. For instance, one student might concentrate more on imagery, while another student might have a greater interest in character motivations. Both of these students can do fine on this exam, because as long as they have the same bare bones, then they receive credit.

 

However, because they are given freer reign in their responses, they can also further explore the avenues in which they are most drawn to as independent learners. I have also had many student lead discussions. I have tried both reading circles (or book clubs) and Socratic seminars. Both of these activities allow students the opportunities to explore their thoughts about course content in more depth. With the reading circles, students may choose from different rules (director, connector, illustrator, etc.) that adhere to the diverse learning modalities of the students. For the Socratic seminar, students are encouraged to write their own questions for a given part of a

text. Similar to the above mentioned reading quiz, this activity provides students the opportunity to further explore their own avenues of thought,

while still addressing the necessary content.

 

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