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Pre-AP English 2

English 2 Pre-AP

 
Week of March 31-April 4, 2014

 

 English 2 Pre-AP

Monday, March 31, 2014

Objective

(Student will…)

1.        apply a variety of reading strategies for reading a Shakespearean drama.

2.       recognize some common Elizabethan words

3.      understand the Shakespearean language and evaluate its use by listening to and reading the play Julius Caesar.

Class Starter

Apex Grammar Tutorial

Teacher Activities

1.      Imagine that you have talked to a group of men that has just murdered one of their friends. Write a few thoughts on how they would feel doing this and what they would say.

2.      Explain to the students that their task is to cut speeches in half while keeping the essential meaning.

3.      Work through an example using the Cutting Text model Handout. http://www.folger.edu/eduLesPlanDtl.cfm?lpid=779

4.      Explain that the cut versions do no need to be poetic but must retain the main idea.

5.      Divide students into groups of three and distribute copies of Antony’s speeches from the speech handouts. Explain that these speeches represent Antony’s reaction to Caesar’s murder-the same situation discussed at the start of class.

6.      Students should cut their assigned speeches and then present the speech orally, justifying their cuttings.

Modifications

Due to having students at multiple levels of second language acquisition (TESOL) and students who need special education modifications, handouts will be available. Lessons will be taught using differentiated instruction and multiple modalities. Extra time is allowed as according to IEP, and mentors will be assigned to help language learners who are struggling.

Student Activities

1.      Participate in discussion over the class starter.

2.      Work through an example using the Cutting Text model Handout with the teacher. http://www.folger.edu/eduLesPlanDtl.cfm?lpid=779

3.      Break into groups of three and look over copies of Antony’s speeches from the speech handouts. These speeches represent Antony’s reaction to Caesar’s murder-the same situation discussed at the start of class.

4.      Cut your assigned speeches and then present the speech orally, justifying your cuttings.

Assessment/Evaluation

Speech cuttings

Homework

Review Act III

Academic Vocabulary

blank verse, tragic hero, irony, understatement, ethos, logos, and pathos, repetition, aside, monologue, soliloquy, irony-verbal, situational, dramatic

 English 2 Pre-AP

Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Objective

(Student will…)

1.       apply a variety of reading strategies for reading a Shakespearean drama.

2.       recognize some common Elizabethan words

3.      understand the Shakespearean language and evaluate its use by listening to and reading the play Julius Caesar.

Class Starter

 

Teacher Activities

1.      Distribute Assassin’s Hand assignment and review it in preparation for Library research on Wednesday

2.      Present material over conflict and the types of conflict.

3.      Present information over metaphor and how Shakespeare infuses his works with metaphors aplenty

4.      Provide study guide questions over act IV.

5.      Begin reading Act IV in class and have students finish it for homework

Modifications

Due to having students at multiple levels of second language acquisition (TESOL) and students who need special education modifications, handouts will be available. Lessons will be taught using differentiated instruction and multiple modalities. Extra time is allowed as according to IEP, and mentors will be assigned to help language learners who are struggling.

Student Activities

1.      Review and ask question about The Assassin’s Hand project

2.      Take notes over conflict and the types of conflict.

3.      Add to notes information over metaphor and how Shakespeare infuses his works with metaphors aplenty

4.      Work on study guide questions over act IV.

5.      Begin reading Act IV in class and finish if for homework

Assessment/Evaluation

Notes, participation

Homework

Finish reading Act IV

Academic Vocabulary

blank verse, tragic hero, irony, understatement, ethos, logos, and pathos, repetition, aside, monologue, soliloquy, irony-verbal, situational, dramatic



English 2 Pre-AP

Wednesday, April 2, 2014

Objective

(Student will…)

1.       apply a variety of reading strategies for reading a Shakespearean drama.

2.       recognize some common Elizabethan words

3.      understand the Shakespearean language and evaluate its use by listening to and reading the play Julius Caesar.

Class Starter

Report to Library

Teacher Activities

1.      Review The Assassin’s Hand Assignment. It will be due Friday, April 4, 2014

2.      Turn class over to Mrs. Spruill for an introduction into using the databases.  

Modifications

Due to having students at multiple levels of second language acquisition (TESOL) and students who need special education modifications, handouts will be available. Lessons will be taught using differentiated instruction and multiple modalities. Extra time is allowed as according to IEP, and mentors will be assigned to help language learners who are struggling.

Student Activities

1.      Review The Assassin’s Hand Assignment. It will be due Friday, April 4, 2014

2.      Turn class over to Mrs. Spruill for an introduction into using the databases. 

Assessment/Evaluation

Practice with databases, research Assassin

Homework

Assassin’s Hand

Academic Vocabulary

blank verse, tragic hero, irony, understatement, ethos, logos, and pathos, repetition, aside, monologue, soliloquy, irony-verbal, situational, dramatic

English 2 Pre-AP

Thursday, April 3, 2014

Objective

(Student will…)

1.      apply a variety of reading strategies for reading a Shakespearean drama.

2.      recognize some common Elizabethan words

3.      understand the Shakespearean language and evaluate its use by listening to and reading the play Julius Caesar.

Class Starter

Apex Grammar Tutorial

Teacher Activities

1.      Distribute and monitor Act IV quiz

2.      Read or play The Tragedy of Julius Caesar Act V

3.      While reading, have students complete Cornell notes. They should have a minimum of 2 pages. Included in their notes should be a list of conflicts and how they are resolved, who the tragic hero is and why, and what was the tragic hero’s major flaw.

4.      Students should finish reading and write the summary for the notes for homework. 

Modifications

Due to having students at multiple levels of second language acquisition (TESOL) and students who need special education modifications, handouts will be available. Lessons will be taught using differentiated instruction and multiple modalities. Extra time is allowed as according to IEP, and mentors will be assigned to help language learners who are struggling.

Student Activities

1.      Take quiz over Act IV of Julius Caesar

2.      Read The Tragedy of Julius Caesar Act V

3.      Take 2 pages of Cornell notes. Include a list of conflicts and how they are resolves, who the tragic hero is and why, what was the tragic hero’s major flaw.

4.      Finish reading and write the summary for the notes. 

Assessment/Evaluation

Quiz Julius Caesar Act IV

Homework

Finish reading Julius Caesar Act V

Academic vocabulary

blank verse, tragic hero, irony, understatement, ethos, logos, and pathos, repetition, aside, monologue, soliloquy, irony-verbal, situational, dramatic

English 2 Pre-AP

Friday, April 4, 2014

Objective

(Student will…)

1.       apply a variety of reading strategies for reading a Shakespearean drama.

2.       recognize some common Elizabethan words

3.      understand the Shakespearean language and evaluate its use by listening to and reading the play Julius Caesar.

Class Starter

Apex Tutorial

Teacher Activities

1.      Add to the running timeline events from Act V

2.      Monitor students as they write, as a timed writing, an essay where they consider the following : What is the true tragedy of this play? Who is the tragic hero? What is the tragic hero’s flaw? How does this flaw bring about the tragic help’s downfall? Grade using the reading scoring guide for comprehension http://167.135.122.32/courses/a-not-migrated/LL352217000/scoreguide_read_comp.htm due Friday, March 26, 2012

Modifications

Due to having students at multiple levels of second language acquisition (TESOL) and students who need special education modifications, handouts will be available. Lessons will be taught using differentiated instruction and multiple modalities. Extra time is allowed as according to IEP, and mentors will be assigned to help language learners who are struggling.

Student Activities

1.      Add to the running timeline events from Act V

2.      Write an essay where you consider the following : What is the true tragedy of this play? Who is the tragic hero? What is the tragic hero’s flaw? How does this flaw bring about the tragic help’s downfall?

Assessment/Evaluation

Participation, essay

Homework

Review for Julius Caesar Test April 15, 2014

Academic Vocabulary

blank verse, tragic hero, irony, understatement, ethos, logos, and pathos, repetition, aside, monologue, soliloquy, irony-verbal, situational, dramatic

Differentiating Instruction

In my classroom, I have used several different methods for differentiating instruction. I have used reading quizzes that are in the form of open ended responses. Some students focus more on certain aspects of reading than others, and the open ended response format allows for that to occur. For instance, one student might concentrate more on imagery, while another student might have a greater interest in character motivations. Both of these students can do fine on this exam, because as long as they have the same bare bones, then they receive credit.

 

However, because they are given freer reign in their responses, they can also further explore the avenues in which they are most drawn to as independent learners. I have also had many student lead discussions. I have tried both reading circles (or book clubs) and Socratic seminars. Both of these activities allow students the opportunities to explore their thoughts about course content in more depth. With the reading circles, students may choose from different rules (director, connector, illustrator, etc.) that adhere to the diverse learning modalities of the students. For the Socratic seminar, students are encouraged to write their own questions for a given part of a

text. Similar to the above mentioned reading quiz, this activity provides students the opportunity to further explore their own avenues of thought,

while still addressing the necessary content.

 

 

English 2 Pre-AP

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Week of March 24-28, 2014

English 2 Pre-AP

Monday, March 24, 2014

Objective

(Student will…)

  1. apply a variety of reading strategies for reading a Shakespearean drama.
  2. recognize some common Elizabethan words
  3. understand the Shakespearean language and evaluate its use by listening to and reading the play Julius Caesar.

Class Starter

Copy unit 12 vocabulary

Teacher Activities

  1. Reteach allusions based on the short cycle assessment results
  2. Discuss what allusions are and revisit Allusions a Day
  3. Distribute and monitor completion of allusion exercises.

Modifications

Due to having students at multiple levels of second language acquisition (TESOL) and students who need special education modifications, handouts will be available. Lessons will be taught using differentiated instruction and multiple modalities. Extra time is allowed as according to IEP, and mentors will be assigned to help language learners who are struggling.

Student Activities

  1. Relearn allusions based on the short cycle assessment results
  2. Discuss what allusions are and revisit Allusions a Day
  3. Complete allusion exercises.

Assessment/Evaluation

Allusion exercises

Homework

Review Act II

Academic Vocabulary

blank verse, tragic hero, irony, understatement, ethos, logos, and pathos, repetition, aside, monologue, soliloquy, irony-verbal, situational, dramatic

English 2 Pre-AP

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Objective

(Student will…)

  1. apply a variety of reading strategies for reading a Shakespearean drama.
  2. recognize some common Elizabethan words
  3. understand the Shakespearean language and evaluate its use by listening to and reading the play Julius Caesar.

Class Starter

Review allusions

Teacher Activities

  1. Distribute and monitor Allusion’s quiz/assessment
  2. Use the Applied Practice Passage 4, questions 25-30
  3. Have students exchange and grade passage while discussing Act II
  4. Create a running timeline of Act I and II on the back board
  5. Review Dramatic Irony using the example from Act I, scene iii: Casca says of Brutus, "O, he sits high in all the people's hearts,/And that which would appear offense in us,/His countenance, like richest alchemy,/Will change to virtue and to worthiness."
  6. Have students quote two passages from Act II that show examples of dramatic irony.
  7. After each quote, tell about the situation and explain what the audience knows that the character does not know.
  8. Review Imagery with students. Lead a discussion explaining the portentous things that Casca saw and heard that night in Act I, scene iii.Make a list of quotes from the passage to support your ideas, explain the imagery for the passage above. Describe what you imagine he saw and heard. Are there modern images that might compare? If so, what are they?
  9. For homework have students Do the same for Calpurnia's dream in Act II, scene ii. and Now have the students try to describe something using imagery. Seen a cool sunset, had a weird dream, or taken a walk on a crowded city street lately? In a paragraph or two, use imagery to describe something. Try to appeal to all the senses. Your description should be under 250 words, but there is no minimum length

Modifications

Due to having students at multiple levels of second language acquisition (TESOL) and students who need special education modifications, handouts will be available. Lessons will be taught using differentiated instruction and multiple modalities. Extra time is allowed as according to IEP, and mentors will be assigned to help language learners who are struggling.

Student Activities

  1. Practice taking an AP exam with the teacher.
  2. Exchange and grade quiz while discussing Act II
  3. Add to running timeline
  4. Review Dramatic Irony using the example from Act I, scene iii: Casca says of Brutus, "O, he sits high in all the people's hearts,/And that which would appear offense in us,/His countenance, like richest alchemy,/Will change to virtue and to worthiness."
  5. Have students quote two passages from Act II that show examples of dramatic irony.
  6. After each quote, tell about the situation and explain what the audience knows that the character does not know.
  7. Review Imagery. Lead a discussion explaining the portentous things that Casca saw and heard that night in Act I, scene iii.Make a list of quotes from the passage to support your ideas, explain the imagery for the passage above. Describe what you imagine he saw and heard. Are there modern images that might compare? If so, what are they?
  8. For homework: Do the same for Calpurnia's dream in Act II, scene ii. and Now have the students try to describe something using imagery. Seen a cool sunset, had a weird dream, or taken a walk on a crowded city street lately? In a paragraph or two, use imagery to describe something. Try to appeal to all the senses. Your descrip