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Pre-AP English 2

Pre-AP English
 
Week of October 13-17, 2014

 

Pre-AP English 2

Monday, October 13, 2014

Objective

(Student will…)

 

Class Starter

 

Teacher Activities

Fall Holiday

Student Activities

Fall Holiday

Assessment/Evaluation

 

Homework

Review notes and Read Ahead in Great Expectations

Academic Vocabulary

 

Pre-AP English 2

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Objective

(Student will…)

  1. delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid, and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning. RI.9-10.8
  2. conduct short research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or boarded the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. W.9-10.7
  3. draw evidence from literary of informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. W.9-10.9
  1. Apply grades 9-10 Reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g. “Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.”)

Class Starter

As the class begins, have the students work in pairs and write a silent conversation. The process is that one student writes the first line of dialogue and passes the paper to the partner who continues the conversation

Teacher Activities

* Since the lesson is excessively long, it will span two days.

  1. Finish lecture from Monday
  2. Next discuss what aspects of Shakespeare's writing the students find the most difficult. Their answers will probably include words like "thee" and "thou," funny verb endings, odd sentence structure, and archaic vocabulary. While they might not articulate all these, as the teacher, you can jump right in and help them out. Then you can explain that you and they will soon be able to eliminate each of these problems.
  3. The best way to begin this activity is to recite a typical wedding vow, using the familiar "thee" and "thou":

    "I, Martin take thee, Jane, as my lawful wife."
    "I, Jane, take thee, Martin, as my lawful husband."

  4. Then give students a brief analysis of the 2nd Person Familiar Pronouns used in Shakespeare's plays. You could write the following examples on the board:

    Singular Pronouns

    Thou - Subject: "Thou art my brother."

    Thee - Object: "Come, let me clutch thee."

    Thy - Possessive Adjective: "What is thy name?"

    Thine - Possessive Noun: "To thine own self be true."

    Plural Pronoun

    Ye - Subject: "Ye shall know me."

     

  5. Students who know French or Spanish can explain the tu form in that language and when it is appropriate to use it-close friends, family, children, animals, and inanimate objects. They can now take out their silent conversations and modify them using the 2nd person familiar pronouns:

    Verb Inflection

    Elizabethan language, though considered Early Modern English, still
    retained some verb inflections. Usually they simply add an -est or -st
    to a word. These were used often with the 2nd person familiar pronouns:

    "Thou liest, malignant thing."

    "What didst thou see?"

    "Why canst thou not see the difference?"

  6. Ask students to add some verb inflections to their silent conversations. I would actually encourage them to overuse them. Sentences such as "What time should'st thou callest?" or "Didst thou drinkest thy Coke when thou wast thirsty?" sound good to me.
  7. Sentence Structure

    A student was once heard to say, "Shakespeare takes a perfectly good sentence and messes it up." How can we help them? Well, it's actually pretty simple.

    Take a complicated sentence. Put each word of the sentence on a separate index card. Mix up the cards. Give a set to a group of about four students. Let them sort out the cards and try to figure out Shakespeare's sentence.

    You'll need to make several packets with the same sentence. Generally, students will arrange the words to make a clear sentence, but they probably won't get Shakespeare's right away. Ask each group to read their sentence out loud and see if anyone else has the same sentence. Continue rearranging until a group gets it close to Shakespeare's. What they are doing is working through some thorny sentences, clustering words, and seeing that Shakespeare's original is really pretty easy to decode. At the conclusion of this, point out to the students that while they may not have gotten his sentence exactly, it doesn't matter. His sentence is not better that theirs; it's just different.

    Here are a few sentences that work well:

    "A glooming peace this morning with it brings." (Romeo and Juliet)

    "That handkerchief did an Egyptian to my mother give." (Othello)

    "Thy shape invisible retain thou still." (The Tempest)

     

  8. Troublesome Words

    Using Handout 1, "80 Troublesome Words," have students rework their silent conversations once more, this time adding as many of these words as possible. In many cases they'll have to rewrite the conversation, but that's ok. I'd require each group to include at least 10 words. When they are done, each group performs their dialogue for the class.

  9. Odd Words

    Finally, repeat the previous exercise using Handout 2, "125 Odd Words." Once again, ask some groups to perform their conversation out loud.

     

  10. Now that the class has a better idea of how Shakespeare's words and sentences work, it is time to dive right into some excellent examples from his actual works. Using Handout 3, "An Insulting Conversation," they will read a series of insulting lines, and savor the sound of those words. One way to do this is to divide the class in half and have students form two lines. When each student is facing someone from the other line, ask them to read the conversation chorally. Instruct them to alternate sides and try to say the lines loud, angrily, and together. If time permits, you might ask for two volunteers to read it at each other. http://www.pbs.org/shakespeare/educators/performance/lessonplan.html

Student Activities

  1. Finish lecture from Monday
  2. Next discuss what aspects of Shakespeare's writing the students find the most difficult. Their answers will probably include words like "thee" and "thou," funny verb endings, odd sentence structure, and archaic vocabulary. While they might not articulate all these, as the teacher, you can jump right in and help them out. Then you can explain that you and they will soon be able to eliminate each of these problems.
  3. The best way to begin this activity is to recite a typical wedding vow, using the familiar "thee" and "thou":

    "I, Martin take thee, Jane, as my lawful wife."
    "I, Jane, take thee, Martin, as my lawful husband."

  4. Then give students a brief analysis of the 2nd Person Familiar Pronouns used in Shakespeare's plays. You could write the following examples on the board:

    Singular Pronouns

    Thou - Subject: "Thou art my brother."

    Thee - Object: "Come, let me clutch thee."

    Thy - Possessive Adjective: "What is thy name?"

    Thine - Possessive Noun: "To thine own self be true."

    Plural Pronoun

    Ye - Subject: "Ye shall know me."

     

  5. Students who know French or Spanish can explain the tu form in that language and when it is appropriate to use it-close friends, family, children, animals, and inanimate objects. They can now take out their silent conversations and modify them using the 2nd person familiar pronouns:

    Verb Inflection

    Elizabethan language, though considered Early Modern English, still
    retained some verb inflections. Usually they simply add an -est or -st
    to a word. These were used often with the 2nd person familiar pronouns:

    "Thou liest, malignant thing."

    "What didst thou see?"

    "Why canst thou not see the difference?"

  6. Ask students to add some verb inflections to their silent conversations. I would actually encourage them to overuse them. Sentences such as "What time should'st thou callest?" or "Didst thou drinkest thy Coke when thou wast thirsty?" sound good to me.
  7. Sentence Structure

    A student was once heard to say, "Shakespeare takes a perfectly good sentence and messes it up." How can we help them? Well, it's actually pretty simple.

    Take a complicated sentence. Put each word of the sentence on a separate index card. Mix up the cards. Give a set to a group of about four students. Let them sort out the cards and try to figure out Shakespeare's sentence.

    You'll need to make several packets with the same sentence. Generally, students will arrange the words to make a clear sentence, but they probably won't get Shakespeare's right away. Ask each group to read their sentence out loud and see if anyone else has the same sentence. Continue rearranging until a group gets it close to Shakespeare's. What they are doing is working through some thorny sentences, clustering words, and seeing that Shakespeare's original is really pretty easy to decode. At the conclusion of this, point out to the students that while they may not have gotten his sentence exactly, it doesn't matter. His sentence is not better that theirs; it's just different.

    Here are a few sentences that work well:

    "A glooming peace this morning with it brings." (Romeo and Juliet)

    "That handkerchief did an Egyptian to my mother give." (Othello)

    "Thy shape invisible retain thou still." (The Tempest)

     

  8. Troublesome Words

    Using Handout 1, "80 Troublesome Words," have students rework their silent conversations once more, this time adding as many of these words as possible. In many cases they'll have to rewrite the conversation, but that's ok. I'd require each group to include at least 10 words. When they are done, each group performs their dialogue for the class.

  9. Odd Words

    Finally, repeat the previous exercise using Handout 2, "125 Odd Words." Once again, ask some groups to perform their conversation out loud.

     

  10. that the class has a better idea of how Shakespeare's words and sentences work, it is time to dive right into some excellent examples from his actual works. Using Handout 3, "An Insulting Conversation," they will read a series of insulting lines, and savor the sound of those words. One way to do this is to divide the class in half and have students form two lines. When each student is facing someone from the other line, ask them to read the conversation chorally. Instruct them to alternate sides and try to say the lines loud, angrily, and together. If time permits, you might ask for two volunteers to read it at each other. http://www.pbs.org/shakespeare/educators/performance/lessonplan.html

Assessment/Evaluation

participation, conversation. Insults

Homework

Review notes and Read Ahead in Great Expectations

Academic Vocabulary

blank verse, tragic hero, irony, understatement, ethos, logos, and pathos, repetition, aside, monologue, soliloquy, irony-verbal, situational, dramatic



Pre-AP English 2

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Objective

(Student will…)

 

Class Starter

PSAT in training facility

Teacher Activities

PSAT in training facility

Student Activities

 

Assessment/Evaluation

 

Homework

 

Academic vocabulary

 

Pre-AP English 2

Thursday, October16, 2014

Objective

(Student will…)

  1. delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid, and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning. RI.9-10.8
  2. conduct short research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or boarded the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. W.9-10.7
  3. draw evidence from literary of informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. W.9-10.9
  1. Apply grades 9-10 Reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g. “Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.”)

Class Starter

As the class begins, have the students work in pairs and write a silent conversation. The process is that one student writes the first line of dialogue and passes the paper to the partner who continues the conversation

Teacher Activities

* Since the lesson is excessively long, it will span two days.

  1. Finish lecture from Monday
  2. Next discuss what aspects of Shakespeare's writing the students find the most difficult. Their answers will probably include words like "thee" and "thou," funny verb endings, odd sentence structure, and archaic vocabulary. While they might not articulate all these, as the teacher, you can jump right in and help them out. Then you can explain that you and they will soon be able to eliminate each of these problems.
  3. The best way to begin this activity is to recite a typical wedding vow, using the familiar "thee" and "thou":

    "I, Martin take thee, Jane, as my lawful wife."
    "I, Jane, take thee, Martin, as my lawful husband."

  4. Then give students a brief analysis of the 2nd Person Familiar Pronouns used in Shakespeare's plays. You could write the following examples on the board:

    Singular Pronouns

    Thou - Subject: "Thou art my brother."

    Thee - Object: "Come, let me clutch thee."

    Thy - Possessive Adjective: "What is thy name?"

    Thine - Possessive Noun: "To thine own self be true."

    Plural Pronoun

    Ye - Subject: "Ye shall know me."

     

  5. Students who know French or Spanish can explain the tu form in that language and when it is appropriate to use it-close friends, family, children, animals, and inanimate objects. They can now take out their silent conversations and modify them using the 2nd person familiar pronouns:

    Verb Inflection

    Elizabethan language, though considered Early Modern English, still
    retained some verb inflections. Usually they simply add an -est or -st
    to a word. These were used often with the 2nd person familiar pronouns:

    "Thou liest, malignant thing."

    "What didst thou see?"

    "Why canst thou not see the difference?"

  6. Ask students to add some verb inflections to their silent conversations. I would actually encourage them to overuse them. Sentences such as "What time should'st thou callest?" or "Didst thou drinkest thy Coke when thou wast thirsty?" sound good to me.
  7. Sentence Structure

    A student was once heard to say, "Shakespeare takes a perfectly good sentence and messes it up." How can we help them? Well, it's actually pretty simple.

    Take a complicated sentence. Put each word of the sentence on a separate index card. Mix up the cards. Give a set to a group of about four students. Let them sort out the cards and try to figure out Shakespeare's sentence.

    You'll need to make several packets with the same sentence. Generally, students will arrange the words to make a clear sentence, but they probably won't get Shakespeare's right away. Ask each group to read their sentence out loud and see if anyone else has the same sentence. Continue rearranging until a group gets it close to Shakespeare's. What they are doing is working through some thorny sentences, clustering words, and seeing that Shakespeare's original is really pretty easy to decode. At the conclusion of this, point out to the students that while they may not have gotten his sentence exactly, it doesn't matter. His sentence is not better that theirs; it's just different.

    Here are a few sentences that work well:

    "A glooming peace this morning with it brings." (Romeo and Juliet)

    "That handkerchief did an Egyptian to my mother give." (Othello)

    "Thy shape invisible retain thou still." (The Tempest)

     

  8. Troublesome Words

    Using Handout 1, "80 Troublesome Words," have students rework their silent conversations once more, this time adding as many of these words as possible. In many cases they'll have to rewrite the conversation, but that's ok. I'd require each group to include at least 10 words. When they are done, each group performs their dialogue for the class.

  9. Odd Words

    Finally, repeat the previous exercise using Handout 2, "125 Odd Words." Once again, ask some groups to perform their conversation out loud.

     

  10. Now that the class has a better idea of how Shakespeare's words and sentences work, it is time to dive right into some excellent examples from his actual works. Using Handout 3, "An Insulting Conversation," they will read a series of insulting lines, and savor the sound of those words. One way to do this is to divide the class in half and have students form two lines. When each student is facing someone from the other line, ask them to read the conversation chorally. Instruct them to alternate sides and try to say the lines loud, angrily, and together. If time permits, you might ask for two volunteers to read it at each other. http://www.pbs.org/shakespeare/educators/performance/lessonplan.html

Student Activities

  1. Finish lecture from Monday
  2. Next discuss what aspects of Shakespeare's writing the students find the most difficult. Their answers will probably include words like "thee" and "thou," funny verb endings, odd sentence structure, and archaic vocabulary. While they might not articulate all these, as the teacher, you can jump right in and help them out. Then you can explain that you and they will soon be able to eliminate each of these problems.
  3. The best way to begin this activity is to recite a typical wedding vow, using the familiar "thee" and "thou":

    "I, Martin take thee, Jane, as my lawful wife."
    "I, Jane, take thee, Martin, as my lawful husband."

  4. Then give students a brief analysis of the 2nd Person Familiar Pronouns used in Shakespeare's plays. You could write the following examples on the board:

    Singular Pronouns

    Thou - Subject: "Thou art my brother."

    Thee - Object: "Come, let me clutch thee."

    Thy - Possessive Adjective: "What is thy name?"

    Thine - Possessive Noun: "To thine own self be true."

    Plural Pronoun

    Ye - Subject: "Ye shall know me."

     

  5. Students who know French or Spanish can explain the tu form in that language and when it is appropriate to use it-close friends, family, children, animals, and inanimate objects. They can now take out their silent conversations and modify them using the 2nd person familiar pronouns:

    Verb Inflection

    Elizabethan language, though considered Early Modern English, still
    retained some verb inflections. Usually they simply add an -est or -st
    to a word. These were used often with the 2nd person familiar pronouns:

    "Thou liest, malignant thing."

    "What didst thou see?"

    "Why canst thou not see the difference?"

  6. Ask students to add some verb inflections to their silent conversations. I would actually encourage them to overuse them. Sentences such as "What time should'st thou callest?" or "Didst thou drinkest thy Coke when thou wast thirsty?" sound good to me.
  7. Sentence Structure

    A student was once heard to say, "Shakespeare takes a perfectly good sentence and messes it up." How can we help them? Well, it's actually pretty simple.

    Take a complicated sentence. Put each word of the sentence on a separate index card. Mix up the cards. Give a set to a group of about four students. Let them sort out the cards and try to figure out Shakespeare's sentence.

    You'll need to make several packets with the same sentence. Generally, students will arrange the words to make a clear sentence, but they probably won't get Shakespeare's right away. Ask each group to read their sentence out loud and see if anyone else has the same sentence. Continue rearranging until a group gets it close to Shakespeare's. What they are doing is working through some thorny sentences, clustering words, and seeing that Shakespeare's original is really pretty easy to decode. At the conclusion of this, point out to the students that while they may not have gotten his sentence exactly, it doesn't matter. His sentence is not better that theirs; it's just different.

    Here are a few sentences that work well:

    "A glooming peace this morning with it brings." (Romeo and Juliet)

    "That handkerchief did an Egyptian to my mother give." (Othello)

    "Thy shape invisible retain thou still." (The Tempest)

     

  8. Troublesome Words

    Using Handout 1, "80 Troublesome Words," have students rework their silent conversations once more, this time adding as many of these words as possible. In many cases they'll have to rewrite the conversation, but that's ok. I'd require each group to include at least 10 words. When they are done, each group performs their dialogue for the class.

  9. Odd Words

    Finally, repeat the previous exercise using Handout 2, "125 Odd Words." Once again, ask some groups to perform their conversation out loud.

     

  10. that the class has a better idea of how Shakespeare's words and sentences work, it is time to dive right into some excellent examples from his actual works. Using Handout 3, "An Insulting Conversation," they will read a series of insulting lines, and savor the sound of those words. One way to do this is to divide the class in half and have students form two lines. When each student is facing someone from the other line, ask them to read the conversation chorally. Instruct them to alternate sides and try to say the lines loud, angrily, and together. If time permits, you might ask for two volunteers to read it at each other. http://www.pbs.org/shakespeare/educators/performance/lessonplan.html

Assessment/Evaluation

participation, conversation. Insults

Homework

Review notes and Read Ahead in Great Expectations

 

List 5 good leaders (past or present) and 5 bad leaders (past or present) and be prepared to defend their choices based on class discussion tomorrow.

Academic vocabulary

blank verse, tragic hero, irony, understatement, ethos, logos, and pathos, repetition, aside, monologue, soliloquy, irony-verbal, situational, dramatic

Pre-AP English 2

Friday, October 10, 2014

Objective

(Student will…)

  1. delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid, and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning. RI.9-10.8
  2. conduct short research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or boarded the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. W.9-10.7
  3. draw evidence from literary of informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. W.9-10.9

  4. Apply grades 9-10 Reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g. “Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.”)
  5.  

  6. demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    1. Use a semicolon (and perhaps a conjunctive adverb) to link two or more closely related independent clauses.
  1. Use a colon to introduce a list or quotation

Class Starter

Write your good leader on one board and your bad leader on another board.

Teacher Activities

  1. Define the word “leader” on the chalkboard.
  2. Open the discussion by asking the students to brainstorm every quality (adjective) they think a good leader should have. Record the responses on 1/2 the board. Then, ask them to do the same for qualities that make a bad leader.
  3. Record and compare the responses.
  4. Lead students into a discussion about friendship by asking the qualities of a good and bad friend.
  5. Record responses and allow students to share personal experiences with these qualities in others.
  6. Lead them by asking the following:
    1. How far would you go to stop a friend from harming your country?
    2. How far would you go to obtain revenge on someone or some group who destroyed your best friend?
    3. Is there anything for which you would betray a friend?
  7. Have students write a brief (one page) essay defending whether friendship or personal principles is more important to them. They must use one phrase, one colon, one semicolon, and parallel structure.

Student Activities

  1. Help define the word “leader” on the chalkboard.
  2. Brainstorm every quality (adjective) you think a good leader should have.
  3. Take notes on the responses on 1/2 the board. Then, do the same for qualities that make a bad leader.
  4. Record and compare the responses.
  5. Discuss friendship. What are some good and bad qualities of friends.
  6. Share personal experiences with these qualities in others.
  7. Answer the following:
    1. How far would you go to stop a friend from harming your country?
    2. How far would you go to obtain revenge on someone or some group who destroyed your best friend?
    3. Is there anything for which you would betray a friend?
  8. Write a brief (one page) essay defending whether friendship or personal principles is more important to them. They must use one phrase, one colon, one semicolon, and parallel structure.

Assessment/Evaluation

Participation and discussion

Homework

Review notes and Read Ahead in Great Expectations

 

Write a brief (one page) essay defending whether friendship or personal principles is more important to them. They must use one phrase, one colon, one semicolon, and parallel structure.

Academic Vocabulary

blank verse, tragic hero, irony, understatement, ethos, logos, and pathos, repetition, aside, monologue, soliloquy, irony-verbal, situational, dramatic

 

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