Pre-AP English 2

                                   Pre-AP English 2
                                          
Week of September 19-23, 2016

Unit 1 Standards

Key Ideas and Details:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.3
Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Craft and Structure

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.5
Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.6
Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature

Text Types and Purposes

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.2
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.2.A
Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.2.B
Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience's knowledge of the topic.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.2.C
Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.2.D
Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.2.E
Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.2.F
Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

Production and Distribution of Writing

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.5
Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1-3 up to and including grades 9-10
here.)

Research to Build and Present Knowledge:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.7
Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.9
Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.4
Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.5
Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.6
Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. (See grades 9-10 Language standards 1 and 3herefor specific expectations.)

 

Conventions of Standard English

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.9-10.1.B
Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.9-10.2
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing

 

Pre-AP English 2

Monday, September 19, 2016

Objective

(Student will…)

NM.CC.RL.9-10.

 

Reading Standards for Literature

 

 

 

Key Ideas and Details

RL.9-10.1.

 

Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RL.9-10.2.

 

Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

NM.RL.9-10.a.

 

Students in grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 will analyze and evaluate common characteristics of significant works of literature from various genres, including Hispanic and Native American oral and written texts.

NM.RL.9-10.b.

 

Students in grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 will cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of British, world, and regional literatures, including various Hispanic and Native American oral and written texts.

 

 

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

RL.9-10.7.

 

Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums, including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment (e.g., Auden's ''Musee des Beaux Arts'' and Breughel's Landscape with the Fall of Icarus).

RL.9-10.10.

 

By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of the grades 9-10 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

 

NM.CC.RI.9-10.

 

Reading Standards for Informational Text

 

 

 

Key Ideas and Details

RI.9-10.1.

 

Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RI.9-10.2.

 

Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

 

 

Craft and Structure

RI.9-10.4.

 

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language of a court opinion differs from that of a newspaper).

RI.9-10.5.

 

Analyze in detail how an author's ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter).

RI.9-10.6.

 

Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.

 

 

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

RI.9-10.7.

 

Analyze various accounts of a subject told in different mediums (e.g., a person's life story in both print and multimedia), determining which details are emphasized in each account.

RI.9-10.8.

 

Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.

NM.RI.9-10.a.

 

Students in grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 will analyze and evaluate common characteristics of significant works, including Hispanic and Native American oral and written texts.

NM.RI.9-10.b.

 

Students in grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 will cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of significant works, including Hispanic and Native American oral and written texts.

 

NM.CC.W.9-10.

 

Writing Standards

 

 

 

Text Types and Purposes

W.9-10.2.

 

Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

W.9-10.2(a)

 

Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

W.9-10.2(b)

 

Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience's knowledge of the topic.

W.9-10.2(c)

 

Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.

W.9-10.2(e)

 

Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

W.9-10.2(f)

 

Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

 

 

Production and Distribution of Writing

W.9-10.4.

 

Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3 above.)

W.9-10.5.

 

Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

 

 

Research to Build and Present Knowledge

W.9-10.8.

 

Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.

W.9-10.10.

 

Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

 

NM.CC.SL.9-10.

 

Speaking and Listening Standards

 

 

 

Comprehension and Collaboration

SL.9-10.1.

 

Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9-10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

SL.9-10.1(a)

 

Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.

SL.9-10.1(b)

 

Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed.

SL.9-10.1(c)

 

Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.

SL.9-10.1(d)

 

Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.

 

NM.CC.L.9-10.

 

Language Standards

 

 

 

Vocabulary Acquisition and Use

L.9-10.4.

 

Determine or clarify theof unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

L.9-10.4(a)

 

Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word's position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

L.9-10.4(d)

 

Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).

L.9-10.6.

 

Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

 

Class Starter

Take notes over imagery from Discovering Voice

Teacher Activities

  1. Begin the session by asking students if they are familiar with the wordannotation. Point out the wordsnoteand notationas clues to the word's meaning. If students know the word, proceed with the next step. If students are unfamiliar, ask them to determine what the word means by seeing what the texts you pass out in the next step have in common.
  2. Pass out a variety of sample texts that use annotations. If you are usingGoogle Books, direct students to texts online to have them examine the annotations that are used.
  3. Post samples from http://umhs.eduhsd.k12.ca.us/Students/Online-Health-Study-Skills/Annotating-a-Text-Sample-and-Directions/ and

    https://www.pinterest.com/pin/456341374714110643/

  4. Have the students skim the texts and carefully examine the annotations. Encourage students to begin to see the variety of ways that an editor of a text uses annotations.
  5. Working with a small group of their peers, students should create a list that shows what effective annotations might do.
  6. Once the small groups have created their lists, share these out in a whole group discussion, creating a list that shows all the ways a reader of a text can annotate that text. This list can be used as a rubric for evaulating/responding to student annotations later in the lesson. Students typically point out how annotations
    1. give definitions to difficult and unfamiliar words.
    2. give background information, especially explaining customs, traditions, and ways of living that may be unfamiliar to the reader.
    3. help explain what is going on in the text.
    4. make connections to other texts.
    5. point out the use of literary techniques and how they add meaning to the text.
    6. can use humor (or other styles that might be quite different from the main text).
    7. reveal that the writer of these annotations knows his or her reader well.
  1. The process of generating this list should move into a discussion about where these annotations came from—who wrote them and why. Guide students to think about the person who wrote these ideas, who looked at the text and did more than just read it, and who made aconnectionwith the text. It is important here that students begin to realize that their understanding of what they have read comes from their interaction with what is on the page. You may wish to jumpstart the conversation by telling students about connections you make with watching films, as students may be more aware of doing so themselves.
  2. Discuss ways that a text can affect readers and ways these effects can cause readers to connect with texts. Feel free to include visual texts in the conversation. Students begin to talk about how stories that they read can
    1. touch them emotionally, making them feel happiness as well as sadness.
    2. remind them of childhood experiences.
    3. teach them something new.
    4. change their perspective on an issue.
    5. help them see how they can better relate to others around them.
    6. help them see the world through someone else's experiences.

      Point out that these effects are also valid ideas for annotation and add them to the list from earlier in the session.

  1. Pass out annotation guide.

Student Activities

  1. Answer if you are familiar with the wordannotation. Notice the wordsnoteand annotationas clues to the word's meaning
  2. Look at the sample annotations.
  3. Skim the texts and carefully examine the annotations. Notice the variety of ways that an editor of a text uses annotations.
  4. Work with a small group of your peers. Create a list that shows what effective annotations might do.
  5. Share these out in a whole group discussion, creating a list that shows all the ways a reader of a text can annotate that text. This list can be used as a rubric for evaulating/responding to student annotations later in the lesson. Students typically point out how annotations
    1. give definitions to difficult and unfamiliar words.
    2. give background information, especially explaining customs, traditions, and ways of living that may be unfamiliar to the reader.
    3. help explain what is going on in the text.
    4. make connections to other texts.
    5. point out the use of literary techniques and how they add meaning to the text.
    6. can use humor (or other styles that might be quite different from the main text).
    7. reveal that the writer of these annotations knows his or her reader well.
  1. Discuss ways that a text can affect readers and ways these effects can cause readers to connect with texts. Feel free to include visual texts in the conversation. Students begin to talk about how stories that they read can
    1. touch them emotionally, making them feel happiness as well as sadness.
    2. remind them of childhood experiences.
    3. teach them something new.
    4. change their perspective on an issue.
    5. help them see how they can better relate to others around them.
    6. help them see the world through someone else's experiences.

Point out that these effects are also valid ideas for annotation and add them to the list from earlier in the session.

Assessment/Evaluation

discussion , annotation

Homework

Work on Personal Dictionary 3

Academic Vocabulary

Annotation

Resources

http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/teaching-student-annotation-constructing-1132.html?tab=4#tabs

Pre-AP English 2

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Daily Objective

(Student will…)

  1. learn that a dependent clause needs an independent clause to complete.
  2. discover adverb, adjective, and noun clauses are kinds of dependent clauses that serve different purposes.
  3. apply the knowledge that adverbs, adjectives, and noun clauses can be used to join ideas together in a sentence

Class Starter

Discovering Voice-Imagery 1

Teacher Activities

  1. Review the first imagery class starter.
  2. Go over the standards and goals of today. Remind students we are working towards an analytical writing over a short story.
  3. Discuss the differences between an independent and a dependent clause.
  4. Ask for a volunteer to come up and select the correct part of the sentence that reflects a dependent clause.
  5. Point out the differences between adverb, adjectives, and noun clauses.
  6. Remind students that they are all types of dependent clauses.
  7. Ask for a new volunteer to come up and determine what types of clauses the samples are.
  8. Check with the class if they are in agreement. Ask if someone wants to come up and make changes before submitting.
  9. Help students in future test, by telling them the rule between o and .
  10. Discuss subordinating conjunctions. See if students know the connection between subordinate clauses and a subordinating conjunctions.
  11. Link subordinating conjunctions and adverb clauses
  12. Have students copy the relative pronouns.
  13. Review nouns, pronouns, and noun clauses.
  14. Have a third volunteer come up and try to distinguish the different types of phrases.
  15. Show students how adverbs, adjective, and noun clauses can be used to join ideas together in a sentence.
  16. Practice joining sentences using dependent clauses.
  17. Discuss the paragraph and how to fix it as a whole class.

Student Activities

  1. Review the first imagery class starter.
  2. Go over the standards and goals of today.
  3. Discuss the differences between an independent and a dependent clause.
  4. Volunteer to come up and select the correct part of the sentence that reflects a dependent clause.
  5. Take notes over the differences between adverb, adjectives, and noun clauses.
  6. A new volunteer come up and determine what types of clauses the samples are.
  7. Discuss subordinating conjunctions.
  8. Copy the relative pronouns.
  9. Review nouns, pronouns, and noun clauses.
  10. A third volunteer should come up and try to distinguish the different types of phrases.
  11. Learn how adverbs, adjective, and noun clauses can be used to join ideas together in a sentence.
  12. Practice joining sentences using dependent clauses.
  13. Discuss the paragraph and how to fix it as a whole class.

Assessment/Evaluation

participation

Homework

Work on personal dictionary #3

Academic Vocabulary

clause, dependent clause, independent clause, adjective and adverb

Modifications

Due to having students at multiple levels of second language acquisition (TESOL) and students who need special education modifications, handouts will be available. Lessons will be taught using differentiated instruction and multiple modalities. Extra time is allowed as according to IEP, and mentors will be assigned to help language learners who are struggling.

Pre-AP

English 2

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Objective

(Student will…)

  1. write a literary analysis making use of appropriate vocabulary and supporting findings with textual evidence.
  2. write a short story that successfully incorporated elements of narrative writing and an appropriate voice.
  3. pass an exam that is made up of 20 percent comprehension, 20 percent vocabulary based questions, and 60 percent skills based questions.

Class Starter

Discovering Voice Imagery 2

Teacher Activities

  1. Use http://achievethecore.org/file/2044 to review the story of “The Monkey’s Paw.”
  2. Use the copy of “The Bridegroom” and make connections to “The Monkey’s Paw.” http://www.cobblearning.net/mrsnelson/files/2014/10/The-Bridegroom-text-1xe56tp.pd
  3. View “The Lights of Marriage,” by Marc Chagall and discuss the art by using Humanities: Art p. 55 http://www.abcgallery.com/C/chagall/ch agall32.html
  4. Test on “The Monkey’s Paw” and “The Bridegroom” on Monday September 19, 2016

Student Activities

  1. Take notes overhttp://achievethecore.org/file/2044 to review the story of “The Monkey’s Paw.”
  2. Use the copy of “The Bridegroom” and make connections to “The Monkey’s Paw.” http://www.cobblearning.net/mrsnelson/files/2014/10/The-Bridegroom-text-1xe56tp.pd
  3. View “The Lights of Marriage,” by Marc Chagall and discuss the art by using Humanities: Art p. 55 http://www.abcgallery.com/C/chagall/ch agall32.html
  4. Test on “The Monkey’s Paw” and “The Bridegroom” on Monday September 19, 2016

Assessment/Evaluation

Participation, questions from homework

Homework

Study for Story quiz on Monday, September 19, 2016

Study for vocabulary quiz #2, Friday September 16, 2016

Modifications

TAG, thesis, organization, evidence, quote, conclusion.

Pre-AP English 2

Thursday, September 22, 2016

Objective

(Student will…)

  1. write a literary analysis making use of appropriate vocabulary and supporting findings with textual evidence.
  2. write a short story that successfully incorporated elements of narrative writing and an appropriate voice.
  3. pass an exam that is made up of 20 percent comprehension, 20 percent vocabulary based questions, and 60 percent skills based questions.

Class Starter

Imagery-3

Teacher Activities

  1. Have students complete practice from yesterday’s lesson over clauses.
  2. Introduce “Streets of Canon” through PowerPoint
  3. Review the vocabulary of the story
  4. Allow students to work in small groups or with a partner to identify elements of the plot, setting, and theme.

Student Activities

  1. Complete practice from yesterday’s lesson over clauses.
  2. Take notes over “Streets of Canon” through PowerPoint
  3. Review the vocabulary of the story
  4. Work in small groups or with a partner to identify elements of the plot, setting, and theme.

Assessment/Evaluation

Annotations

Homework

Finish reading and working with the story

Academic vocabulary

plot, setting, theme

Modifications

Due to having students at multiple levels of second language acquisition (TESOL) and students who need special education modifications, handouts will be available. Lessons will be taught using differentiated instruction and multiple modalities. Extra time is allowed as according to IEP, and mentors will be assigned to help language learners who are struggling.

Pre-AP English 2

Friday, September 23, 2016

Objective

(Student will…)

  1. write a literary analysis making use of appropriate vocabulary and supporting findings with textual evidence.
  2. write a short story that successfully incorporated elements of narrative writing and an appropriate voice.
  3. pass an exam that is made up of 20 percent comprehension, 20 percent vocabulary based questions, and 60 percent skills based questions.

Class Starter

Imagery-4

Teacher Activities

  1. Have students complete quiz over clauses.
  2. Introduce “Streets of Canon” through PowerPoint
  3. Review the vocabulary of the story
  4. Allow students to work in small groups or with a partner to identify elements of the plot, setting, and theme.

Student Activities

  1. Complete quiz over cclauses.
  2. Take notes over “Streets of Canon” through PowerPoint
  3. Review the vocabulary of the story
  4. Work in small groups or with a partner to identify elements of the plot, setting, and theme.

Assessment/Evaluation

Annotations

Homework

Finish reading and working with the story

Academic Vocabulary

plot, setting, theme

Differentiating Instruction

In my classroom, I have used several different methods for differentiating instruction. I have used reading quizzes that are in the form of open ended responses. Some students focus more on certain aspects of reading than others, and the open ended response format allows for that to occur. For instance, one student might concentrate more on imagery, while another student might have a greater interest in character motivations. Both of these students can do fine on this exam, because as long as they have the same bare bones, then they receive credit.

 

However, because they are given freer rein in their responses, they can also further explore the avenues in which they are most drawn to as independent learners. I have also had many student lead discussions. I have tried both reading circles (and book clubs) and Socratic seminars. Both of these activities allow students the opportunities to explore their thoughts about course content in more depth. With the reading circles, students may choose from different rules (director, connector, illustrator, etc.) that adhere to the diverse learning modalities of the students. For the Socratic seminar, students are encouraged to write their own questions for a given part of a text. Similar to the above mentioned reading quiz, this activity provides students the opportunity to further explore their own avenues of thought, while still addressing the necessary content.

 

                                  
 Pre-AP English 2

                                          
Week of September 12-16, 2016

Unit 1 Standards

Key Ideas and Details:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.3
Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Craft and Structure

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.5
Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.6
Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature

Text Types and Purposes

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.2
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.2.A
Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.2.B
Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience's knowledge of the topic.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.2.C
Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.2.D
Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.2.E
Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.2.F
Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

Production and Distribution of Writing

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.5
Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1-3 up to and including grades 9-10
here.)

Research to Build and Present Knowledge:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.7
Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.9
Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.4
Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.5
Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.6
Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. (See grades 9-10 Language standards 1 and 3herefor specific expectations.)

 

Conventions of Standard English

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.9-10.1.B
Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.9-10.2
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing

 

Pre-AP English 2

Monday, September 12, 2016

Objective

(Student will…)

NM.CC.RL.9-10.

 

Reading Standards for Literature

 

 

 

Key Ideas and Details

RL.9-10.1.

 

Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RL.9-10.2.

 

Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

NM.RL.9-10.a.

 

Students in grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 will analyze and evaluate common characteristics of significant works of literature from various genres, including Hispanic and Native American oral and written texts.

NM.RL.9-10.b.

 

Students in grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 will cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of British, world, and regional literatures, including various Hispanic and Native American oral and written texts.

 

 

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

RL.9-10.7.

 

Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums, including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment (e.g., Auden's ''Musee des Beaux Arts'' and Breughel's Landscape with the Fall of Icarus).

RL.9-10.10.

 

By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of the grades 9-10 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

 

NM.CC.RI.9-10.

 

Reading Standards for Informational Text

 

 

 

Key Ideas and Details

RI.9-10.1.

 

Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RI.9-10.2.

 

Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

 

 

Craft and Structure

RI.9-10.4.

 

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language of a court opinion differs from that of a newspaper).

RI.9-10.5.

 

Analyze in detail how an author's ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter).

RI.9-10.6.

 

Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.

 

 

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

RI.9-10.7.

 

Analyze various accounts of a subject told in different mediums (e.g., a person's life story in both print and multimedia), determining which details are emphasized in each account.

RI.9-10.8.

 

Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.

NM.RI.9-10.a.

 

Students in grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 will analyze and evaluate common characteristics of significant works, including Hispanic and Native American oral and written texts.

NM.RI.9-10.b.

 

Students in grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 will cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of significant works, including Hispanic and Native American oral and written texts.

 

NM.CC.W.9-10.

 

Writing Standards

 

 

 

Text Types and Purposes

W.9-10.2.

 

Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

W.9-10.2(a)

 

Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

W.9-10.2(b)

 

Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience's knowledge of the topic.

W.9-10.2(c)

 

Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.

W.9-10.2(e)

 

Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

W.9-10.2(f)

 

Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

 

 

Production and Distribution of Writing

W.9-10.4.

 

Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3 above.)

W.9-10.5.

 

Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

 

 

Research to Build and Present Knowledge

W.9-10.8.

 

Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.

W.9-10.10.

 

Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

 

NM.CC.SL.9-10.

 

Speaking and Listening Standards

 

 

 

Comprehension and Collaboration

SL.9-10.1.

 

Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9-10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

SL.9-10.1(a)

 

Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.

SL.9-10.1(b)

 

Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed.

SL.9-10.1(c)

 

Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.

SL.9-10.1(d)

 

Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.

 

NM.CC.L.9-10.

 

Language Standards

 

 

 

Vocabulary Acquisition and Use

L.9-10.4.

 

Determine or clarify theof unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

L.9-10.4(a)

 

Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word's position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

L.9-10.4(d)

 

Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).

L.9-10.6.

 

Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

 

Class Starter

Take notes over detail from Discovering Voice

Teacher Activities

  1. Begin the session by asking students if they are familar with the wordannotation. Point out the wordsnoteandnotationas clues to the word's meaning. If students know the word, proceed with the next step. If students are unfamiliar, ask them to determine what the word means by seeing what the texts you pass out in the next step have in common.
  2. Pass out a variety of sample texts that use annotations. If you are usingGoogle Books, direct students to texts online to have them examine the annotations that are used.
  3. Post samples from http://umhs.eduhsd.k12.ca.us/Students/Online-Health-Study-Skills/Annotating-a-Text-Sample-and-Directions/ and

    https://www.pinterest.com/pin/456341374714110643/

  4. Have the students skim the texts and carefully examine the annotations. Encourage students to begin to see the variety of ways that an editor of a text uses annotations.
  5. Working with a small group of their peers, students should create a list that shows what effective annotations might do.
  6. Once the small groups have created their lists, share these out in a whole group discussion, creating a list that shows all the ways a reader of a text can annotate that text. This list can be used as a rubric for evaulating/responding to student annotations later in the lesson. Students typically point out how annotations
    1. give definitions to difficult and unfamiliar words.
    2. give background information, especially explaining customs, traditions, and ways of living that may be unfamiliar to the reader.
    3. help explain what is going on in the text.
    4. make connections to other texts.
    5. point out the use of literary techniques and how they add meaning to the text.
    6. can use humor (or other styles that might be quite different from the main text).
    7. reveal that the writer of these annotations knows his or her reader well.
  1. The process of generating this list should move into a discussion about where these annotations came from—who wrote them and why. Guide students to think about the person who wrote these ideas, who looked at the text and did more than just read it, and who made aconnectionwith the text. It is important here that students begin to realize that their understanding of what they have read comes from their interaction with what is on the page. You may wish to jumpstart the conversation by telling students about connections you make with watching films, as students may be more aware of doing so themselves.
  2. Discuss ways that a text can affect readers and ways these effects can cause readers to connect with texts. Feel free to include visual texts in the conversation. Students begin to talk about how stories that they read can
    1. touch them emotionally, making them feel happiness as well as sadness.
    2. remind them of childhood experiences.
    3. teach them something new.
    4. change their perspective on an issue.
    5. help them see how they can better relate to others around them.
    6. help them see the world through someone else's experiences.

      Point out that these effects are also valid ideas for annotation and add them to the list from earlier in the session.

  1. Pass out annotation guide.

Student Activities

  1. Answer if you are familiar with the wordannotation. Notice the wordsnoteand annotationas clues to the word's meaning
  2. Look at the sample annotations.
  3. Skim the texts and carefully examine the annotations. Notice the variety of ways that an editor of a text uses annotations.
  4. Work with a small group of your peers. Create a list that shows what effective annotations might do.
  5. Share these out in a whole group discussion, creating a list that shows all the ways a reader of a text can annotate that text. This list can be used as a rubric for evaulating/responding to student annotations later in the lesson. Students typically point out how annotations
    1. give definitions to difficult and unfamiliar words.
    2. give background information, especially explaining customs, traditions, and ways of living that may be unfamiliar to the reader.
    3. help explain what is going on in the text.
    4. make connections to other texts.
    5. point out the use of literary techniques and how they add meaning to the text.
    6. can use humor (or other styles that might be quite different from the main text).
    7. reveal that the writer of these annotations knows his or her reader well.
  1. Discuss ways that a text can affect readers and ways these effects can cause readers to connect with texts. Feel free to include visual texts in the conversation. Students begin to talk about how stories that they read can
    1. touch them emotionally, making them feel happiness as well as sadness.
    2. remind them of childhood experiences.
    3. teach them something new.
    4. change their perspective on an issue.
    5. help them see how they can better relate to others around them.
    6. help them see the world through someone else's experiences.

Point out that these effects are also valid ideas for annotation and add them to the list from earlier in the session.

Assessment/Evaluation

discussion

Homework

Apply what you learned to “The Monkey Paw’s!”

Academic Vocabulary

Annotation

Resources

http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/teaching-student-annotation-constructing-1132.html?tab=4#tabs

Pre-AP English 2

Tuesday, September 13, 2016

Daily Objective

(Student will…)

  1. write a literary analysis making use of appropriate vocabulary and supporting findings with textual evidence.
  2. write a short story that successfully incorporated elements of narrative writing and an appropriate voice.
  3. pass an exam that is made up of 20 percent comprehension, 20 percent vocabulary based questions, and 60 percent skills based questions.

Class Starter

  1. Discovering Voice, Details 1

Teacher Activities

  1. QuickWrite - “Describe a situation whose outcome seemed to be decided by fate, luck, or chance” (p. 45 from Elements of Literature, 4th edition, 1993)
  2. Show PPT of Elements of “The Monkey’s Paw.”
  3. Review short story elements (plot diagram) using pp. 2-6 of Elements of Literature
  4. Introduce W.W. Jacobs and additional information needed for “The Monkey’s Paw” pp. 44-45 from Elements of Literature, 4th edition, 1993. Include foreshadowing, culture, and predicting outcomes.
  5. Facilitate reading of “The Monkey’s Paw” pp. 46-53.
  6. Have students complete the graphic organizer over prediction and actual outcome.
  7. Facilitate annolighting of “The Monkey’s Paw” for short story elements and structure, foreshadowing, and predicting outcomes.
  8. Remind students to be looking for a short story for the final. It must be found by Tuesday, September 13, 2012.

Student Activities

  1. Take notes over short story elements using pp. 2-6
  2. Add to personal notes information on W. W. Jacobs and additional information needed for “The Monkey’s Paw.”
  3. Participate in reading of “The Monkey’s Paw” pp. 46-53.
  4. Annolight “The Monkey’s Paw” for short story elements and structure, foreshadowing, and predicting outcomes.

Assessment/Evaluation

Finish annolighting “The Monkey’s Paw” and the graphic organization

Look for an independent short story for final exam

Homework

annotation

Academic Vocabulary

annotation,, foreshowing, predication

Modifications

Due to having students at multiple levels of second language acquisition (TESOL) and students who need special education modifications, handouts will be available. Lessons will be taught using differentiated instruction and multiple modalities. Extra time is allowed as according to IEP, and mentors will be assigned to help language learners who are struggling.

Pre-AP

English 2

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Objective

(Student will…)

  1. write a literary analysis making use of appropriate vocabulary and supporting findings with textual evidence.
  2. write a short story that successfully incorporated elements of narrative writing and an appropriate voice.
  3. pass an exam that is made up of 20 percent comprehension, 20 percent vocabulary based questions, and 60 percent skills based questions.

Class Starter

Discovering Voice, Detail practice 3

Teacher Activities

  1. Pass out theAnnotation Sheetand ask the students to choose a particularly memorable section of the story, a section large enough to fill up the lines given to them on theAnnotation Sheet. (NOTE: While you could have the students create annotations in the margins of the entire text, isolating a small portion of the text will make the students' first attempt at annotations less daunting and more manageable. You can also use ReadWriteThink interactivesLiterary GraffitiorWebbing Toolat this point in the instructional process, replacing or supplementing theAnnotation Sheethandout.)
  1. Have students swap “The Monkey’s Paw.”
  2. Explain that, working in pairs, the students will examine each other's annotations and look for ideas that have the potential for further development and revision.
  3. Distribute copies theAnnotation Peer Review Guideand explain how it will help them work together to select the best ideas that they have presented in their annotations. Peer review partners should label each annotation, comment on it, and look for several annotations that would benefit from revision and continued thinking.
  4. Have each pair narrow down their ideas to the four or five most significant annotations per student.
  5. Once this is done, give the students time to start revising and developing their ideas. Encourage them to elaborate on their ideas by explaining connections more fully, doing basic research to answer questions or find necessary information, or providing whatever other development would be appropriate.
  6. Circulate the room to look at what the students have chosen so that you can guide them with their development and writing. If you see the need to offer more guiding feedback, collecting the annotation revisions during this process may be helpful.

Student Activities

  1. Look over theAnnotation Sheetand choose a particularly memorable section of the story, a section large enough to fill up the lines given to them on theAnnotation Sheet
  1. Swap “The Monkey’s Paw” with a partner
  2. Working in pairs, examine each other's annotations and look for ideas that have the potential for further development and revision.
  3. Look over copies of theAnnotation Peer Review Guideand work together to select the best ideas that they have presented in their annotations.
  4. Peer review partners should label each annotation, comment on it, and look for several annotations that would benefit from revision and continued thinking.
  5. Narrow down their ideas to the four or five most significant annotations per student.
  6. Once this is done, start revising and developing your ideas. Elaborate on their ideas by explaining connections more fully, doing basic research to answer questions or find necessary information, or providing whatever other development would be appropriate.

Assessment/Evaluation

Participation and notes and annotations

Homework

Study for vocabulary test #2

Modifications

Due to having students at multiple levels of second language acquisition (TESOL) and students who need special education modifications, handouts will be available. Lessons will be taught using differentiated instruction and multiple modalities. Extra time is allowed as according to IEP, and mentors will be assigned to help language learners who are struggling.

Pre-AP English 2

Thursday, September 15, 2016

Objective

(Student will…)

  1. write a literary analysis making use of appropriate vocabulary and supporting findings with textual evidence.
  2. write a short story that successfully incorporated elements of narrative writing and an appropriate voice.
  3. pass an exam that is made up of 20 percent comprehension, 20 percent vocabulary based questions, and 60 percent skills based questions.

Class Starter

Discovering Voice Detail 2

Teacher Activities

  1. Use http://achievethecore.org/file/2044 to review the story of “The Monkey’s Paw.”
  2. Use the copy of “The Bridegroom” and make connections to “The Monkey’s Paw.” http://www.cobblearning.net/mrsnelson/files/2014/10/The-Bridegroom-text-1xe56tp.pd
  3. View “The Lights of Marriage,” by Marc Chagall and discuss the art by using Humanities: Art p. 55 http://www.abcgallery.com/C/chagall/ch agall32.html
  4. Test on “The Monkey’s Paw” and “The Bridegroom” on Monday September 19, 2016

Student Activities

  1. Take notes overhttp://achievethecore.org/file/2044 to review the story of “The Monkey’s Paw.”
  2. Use the copy of “The Bridegroom” and make connections to “The Monkey’s Paw.” http://www.cobblearning.net/mrsnelson/files/2014/10/The-Bridegroom-text-1xe56tp.pd
  3. View “The Lights of Marriage,” by Marc Chagall and discuss the art by using Humanities: Art p. 55 http://www.abcgallery.com/C/chagall/ch agall32.html
  4. Test on “The Monkey’s Paw” and “The Bridegroom” on Monday September 19, 2016

Assessment/Evaluation

Participation, questions from homework

Homework

Study for Story quiz on Monday, September 19, 2016

Study for vocabulary quiz #2, Friday September 16, 2016

Academic vocabulary

TAG, thesis, organization, evidence, quote, conclusion.

Modifications

Due to having students at multiple levels of second language acquisition (TESOL) and students who need special education modifications, handouts will be available. Lessons will be taught using differentiated instruction and multiple modalities. Extra time is allowed as according to IEP, and mentors will be assigned to help language learners who are struggling.

Pre-AP English 2

Friday, September 16, 2016

Objective

(Student will…)

  1. understand and appreciate how the elements of fiction contribute to the meaning of any story and apply that knowledge to the short story, the novel, and poetry.
  2. improve vocabulary and vocabulary usage in writing by reading and developing sentences
  3. analyze and interpret samples of good writing, identifying and explaining an author’s purpose and the social and literary impact of the work
  4. apply effective strategies and techniques in their own expository writing as it applies to literature respond in written form to AP essay prompts
  5. respond to literature through group discussions and

Class Starter

Lesson 4: Detail

Teacher Activities

  1. Play review game
  2. Monitor Vocabulary Test 2
  3. When students are finished, allow them to finish ‘The Monkey’s Paw” and “The Bridegroom” or Personal Dictionary #2

Student Activities

  1. Play review game
  2. Monitor Vocabulary Test 2
  3. Finish “The Monkey’s Paw” and “The Bridegroom” or Personal Dictionary #2

Assessment/Evaluation

Vocabulary Test 2

Homework

Story Quiz Monday, September 19, 2016

Academic Vocabulary

Plot, structure, conflict, characterization, theme, point of view, symbol, allegory, fantasy, humor, irony

Differentiating Instruction

In my classroom, I have used several different methods for differentiating instruction. I have used reading quizzes that are in the form of open ended responses. Some students focus more on certain aspects of reading than others, and the open ended response format allows for that to occur. For instance, one student might concentrate more on imagery, while another student might have a greater interest in character motivations. Both of these students can do fine on this exam, because as long as they have the same bare bones, then they receive credit.

 

However, because they are given freer rein in their responses, they can also further explore the avenues in which they are most drawn to as independent learners. I have also had many student lead discussions. I have tried both reading circles (and book clubs) and Socratic seminars. Both of these activities allow students the opportunities to explore their thoughts about course content in more depth. With the reading circles, students may choose from different rules (director, connector, illustrator, etc.) that adhere to the diverse learning modalities of the students. For the Socratic seminar, students are encouraged to write their own questions for a given part of a text. Similar to the above mentioned reading quiz, this activity provides students the opportunity to further explore their own avenues of thought, while still addressing the necessary content.

 


 Pre-AP English 2

                                          
Week of September 5-9, 2016

Unit 1 Standards

Key Ideas and Details:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.3
Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Craft and Structure

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.5
Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.6
Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature

Text Types and Purposes

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.2
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.2.A
Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.2.B
Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience's knowledge of the topic.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.2.C
Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.2.D
Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.2.E
Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.2.F
Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

Production and Distribution of Writing

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.5
Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1-3 up to and including grades 9-10 
here.)

Research to Build and Present Knowledge:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.7
Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.9
Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.4
Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.5
Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.6
Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. (See grades 9-10 Language standards 1 and 3here for specific expectations.)

 

Conventions of Standard English

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.9-10.1.B
Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.9-10.2
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing

 

 English 2

Monday, September 5, 2016

Objective

(Student will…)

Labor Day

Class Starter

Labor Day

Teacher Activities

Labor Day

Student Activities

Labor Day

Assessment/Evaluation

 

Homework

 

Academic Vocabulary

 

 English 2

Tuesday, September 6, 2016

Daily Objective

(Student will…)

1.      write a literary analysis making use of appropriate vocabulary and supporting findings with textual evidence.

2.      write a short story that successfully incorporated elements of narrative writing and an appropriate voice.

3.      pass an exam that is made up of 20 percent comprehension, 20 percent vocabulary based questions, and 60 percent skills based questions.

Class Starter

Take notes over diction from Discovering Voice

Teacher Activities

1.      Review notes over diction. See what the students felt was important information.

2.      Practice with “good” words. Have every student come up with a synonym for good.

3.      Pass out “early Autumn” by Langston Huges to any students absent. This link has the test and a sample student analysis. http://www.mpsaz.org/rmhs/staff/dmsokol/101/analysis/files/early_autumn_langston_hughes.pdf

4.      Have students make predictions of what the story means just by looking at the title.

5.      Read the first time, together, only for meaning. Students should not have any writing utensil in their hand.

6.      Discuss how accurate the predications were and discuss how the title relates to the meaning of the story.

7.      Read again, but have students look only at diction. They should circle words they do not know, words they want to discuss the choice in, and words that work together to make tone.

8.      Assign homework.

Student Activities

1.      Take notes over diction and discuss with class what is important.

2.      Come up with a synonym for good. If needed, use a thesaurus.

3.      Look over the title of “Early Autumn” and create a predication about what the story may be about based only on title.

4.      Follow along and listen as the story is read to the class. Listen for comprehension.

5.      Discuss the accuracy of predications and how the title ties into the story.

9.       Follow along a second time and analyze diction. Circle words you do not know, words you want to discuss the choice of, and words that work together to make tone.

Assessment/Evaluation

Participation and notes

Homework

Work on personal dictionary due Friday, 9 September 2016

Read “Early Autumn”  and answer the following questions: Big Ide-What does the author’s word choice and narration reveal about the relationship between Bill and Mary?

         Sub-question: How does the author’s use of dialogue reveal the point of view of each individual character? Who cares about the more? How do you know?

         Sub Question: How do the narrator’s description of characters and description of setting reflect the relation between the characters?

Academic Vocabulary

diction, narration, dialogue, point of view, setting

Modifications

Due to having students at multiple levels of second language acquisition (TESOL) and students who need special education modifications, handouts will be available. Lessons will be taught using differentiated instruction and multiple modalities. Extra time is allowed as according to IEP, and mentors will be assigned to help language learners who are struggling.



English 2

Wednesday, September 7, 2016

Objective

(Student will…)

1.      write a literary analysis making use of appropriate vocabulary and supporting findings with textual evidence.

2.      write a short story that successfully incorporated elements of narrative writing and an appropriate voice.

3.      pass an exam that is made up of 20 percent comprehension, 20 percent vocabulary based questions, and 60 percent skills based questions.

Class Starter

Diction 1 Holes/Louis Sachar p. 10

Teacher Activities

1.      Go over class starter. Ask for a few examples on the “Now you Try It” and begin a perfect word list on the board.

2.      Discuss the difference of Literary Fiction and Commercial Fiction.

3.      Use Twilight and Harry Potter  as examples of commercial and literary fiction.

4.      Debate if “Early Autumn” is commercial or literary, or good or bad.

Student Activities

1.      Go over class starter. Participate in providing sentences for “Now you Try It” and begin a perfect word list on the board.

2.      Discuss the difference of Literary Fiction and Commercial Fiction.

3.      Use Twilight and Harry Potter  as examples of commercial and literary fiction.

4.      Debate if “Early Autumn” is commercial or literary, or good or bad.

Assessment/Evaluation

Participation and notes

Homework

Work on personal dictionary due Friday, 9 September 2016

Read “The Monkey’s Paw”

Modifications

Due to having students at multiple levels of second language acquisition (TESOL) and students who need special education modifications, handouts will be available. Lessons will be taught using differentiated instruction and multiple modalities. Extra time is allowed as according to IEP, and mentors will be assigned to help language learners who are struggling.

English 2

Thursday, September 8, 2016

Objective

(Student will…)

1.      write a literary analysis making use of appropriate vocabulary and supporting findings with textual evidence.

2.      write a short story that successfully incorporated elements of narrative writing and an appropriate voice.

3.      pass an exam that is made up of 20 percent comprehension, 20 percent vocabulary based questions, and 60 percent skills based questions.

Class Starter

Discovering Voice Diction 2 M.C. Higgins, the Great/Virginia Hamilton

Teacher Activities

1.      Review the class starter. Continue adding to the perfect word list.

2.      Discuss the student’s answer to  the following questions:

·         Big Ide-What does the author’s word choice and narration reveal about the relationship between Bill and Mary?

·         Sub-question: How does the author’s use of dialogue reveal the point of view of each individual character? Who cares about the more? How do you know?

·         Sub Question: How do the narrator’s description of characters and description of setting reflect the relation between the characters?

3.      Read with the students the Sample Analysis. Discuss the elements that made the essay good, such as TAG, thesis, organization, evidence, quotes, and conclusion.

Student Activities

1.      Review the class starter. Continue adding to the perfect word list.

2.      Discuss answers to  the following questions:

·         Big Ide-What does the author’s word choice and narration reveal about the relationship between Bill and Mary?

·         Sub-question: How does the author’s use of dialogue reveal the point of view of each individual character? Who cares about the more? How do you know?

·         Sub Question: How do the narrator’s description of characters and description of setting reflect the relation between the characters?

3.      Read Sample Analysis. Discuss the elements that made the essay good, such as TAG, thesis, organization, evidence, quotes, and conclusion.

Assessment/Evaluation

Participation, questions from homework

Homework

Work on personal dictionary due Friday, 9 September 2016

Read “The Monkey’s Paw”

Academic vocabulary

TAG, thesis, organization, evidence, quote, conclusion.

Modifications

Due to having students at multiple levels of second language acquisition (TESOL) and students who need special education modifications, handouts will be available. Lessons will be taught using differentiated instruction and multiple modalities. Extra time is allowed as according to IEP, and mentors will be assigned to help language learners who are struggling.

English 2

Friday, September 9, 2016

Objective

(Student will…)

1.      understand and appreciate how the elements of fiction contribute write a literary analysis making use of appropriate vocabulary and supporting findings with textual evidence.

2.      write a short story that successfully incorporated elements of narrative writing and an appropriate voice.

3.      pass an exam that is made up of 20 percent comprehension, 20 percent vocabulary based questions, and 60 percent skills based questions. 

Class Starter

Diction 3, p. 13 I Know Why the Cage Bird

Teacher Activities

1.      QuickWrite - “Describe a situation whose outcome seemed to be decided by fate, luck, or chance” (p. 45 from Elements of Literature, 4th edition, 1993)  

2.      Review short story elements (plot diagram) using pp. 2-6 of Elements of Literature

3.      Introduce W.W. Jacobs and additional information needed for “The Monkey’s Paw” pp. 44-45 from Elements of Literature, 4th edition, 1993.  Include foreshadowing, culture, and predicting outcomes.

4.      Facilitate reading of “The Monkey’s Paw” pp. 46-53.

5.      Have students complete the graphic organizer over prediction and actual outcome.

6.      Facilitate annolighting of “The Monkey’s Paw” for short story elements and structure, foreshadowing, and predicting outcomes.

7.      Remind students to be looking for a short story for the final. It must be found by Tuesday, September 13, 2012.

Student Activities

1.      Take notes over short story elements using pp. 2-6

2.      Add to personal notes information on W. W. Jacobs and additional information needed for “The Monkey’s Paw.”

3.      Participate in reading of “The Monkey’s Paw” pp. 46-53.

4.      Annolight “The Monkey’s Paw” for short story elements and structure, foreshadowing, and predicting outcomes.

Assessment/Evaluation

discussion, annotation

Homework

Finish annolighting “The Monkey’s Paw” and the graphic organization

Look for an independent short story for final exam

Academic Vocabulary

foreshadowing, culture, predicting outcomes

Differentiating Instruction

In my classroom, I have used several different methods for differentiating instruction. I have used reading quizzes that are in the form of open ended responses. Some students focus more on certain aspects of reading than others, and the open ended response format allows for that to occur. For instance, one student might concentrate more on imagery, while another student might have a greater interest in character motivations. Both of these students can do fine on this exam, because as long as they have the same bare bones, then they receive credit.

 

However, because they are given freer rein in their responses, they can also further explore the avenues in which they are most drawn to as independent learners. I have also had many student lead discussions. I have tried both reading circles (and book clubs) and Socratic seminars. Both of these activities allow students the opportunities to explore their thoughts about course content in more depth. With the reading circles, students may choose from different rules (director, connector, illustrator, etc.) that adhere to the diverse learning modalities of the students. For the Socratic seminar, students are encouraged to write their own questions for a given part of a text. Similar to the above mentioned reading quiz, this activity provides students the opportunity to further explore their own avenues of thought, while still addressing the necessary content.

 

 

 

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